Procurement Skills – 4 Keys to Increasing Your Personal Productivity

Your personal productivity is the key to demonstrating why your organisation should continue to invest in you. You can think of your personal productivity as the value you add divided by the time over which you add it. The more value you can create in a given time period, the greater your productivity. There are four essential keys that you can use to unlock further personal productivity in your procurement activity.

1. Reach. This is a measure of the number of people who receive the value you add; the greater the number of people who are impacted, the greater your productivity. You need to identify the recipients of the value you create and make sure that they understand who has generated it and also that they appreciate it. Show them how your value helps them to achieve their goals and objectives.

2. Recency. This refers to the time that has passed since you last created value. Value created last year has much less impact than value created yesterday and so shows less productivity. Ask yourself whether the value you create is quickly consumed and forgotten by the recipient or whether it is something they continue to use. For example, if the value you added was to give someone some procurement advice about a contract six months ago, in all probability they will have forgotten by now. If the value is quickly consumed you need to assess what further value you can add for this group of people.

3. Core. This is what is at the heart of the value you add. For example, the core of the value you add when managing suppliers could be to reduce risk to your organisation or it could be to deliver innovation from the supply market. This core is of much greater value than one which eases the administrative burden for others when raising a purchase order. Write a succinct statement of what the core of your value is for each group of people you impact and relate it to their goals and objectives or even your corporate objectives.

4. Quantity. The greater the number of times you have created value, the greater your personal productivity. For example, if you create just one sourcing strategy a year you will be less productive than if you create six of them.

Conceptually, your personal productivity is the result of multiplying together the outputs from these four keys and dividing by the time period it took to achieve them. Although there is no mathematical basis for this, it does give you a subjective feel for whether or not you are increasing your personal productivity and also a means of explaining to others why it has increased.